Essmaiil  Djamali

Essmaiil Djamali, Ph.D.

Visiting Assistant Professor of Chemistry

edjamali@callutheran.edu
805-493-3612
Swenson 117

Office Hours: MWF 9:15-10:15AM, Thr 5:00-6:00pm

Profile

I obtained a B.S. in mathematics from Barry University and a Ph.D. from University of California, San Diego (UCSD) and San Diego State University (SDSU) in Chemistry. I joined Prof. Forest Rohwer (Biology, SDSU) as a post-doctoral research associate investigating the metabolic processes and heat production from bacteria in sea water in the presence and absence of viruses (phage). I then became the director of the Center for Hydrothermal Research at the SDSU research foundation (2006–2011) and maintain the position of adjunct faculty in the department of Chemistry & Biochemistry at SDSU (2009–present).

In 2011-2012, I joined Prof. Mason Tomson’s research group (Civil and Environmental Engineering) at Rice University as a Senior Research Scientist and was involved in a theoretical/experimental study of thermodynamic properties of scale formation in mixed solvent systems at high temperatures and pressures. As a senior research scientist, I collaborated with Prof. Walter Chapman’s research group (Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering) at Rice University (2012-2019). The objective of our research was to develop a molecular understanding needed to describe the thermodynamic and kinetic behavior of aqueous systems and to apply these results to fundamental problems encountered in industrial processes that are concerned with the use of high temperature and pressure aqueous (and mixed solvent) solutions.

Currently, I am a visiting assistant professor of chemistry at California Lutheran University.

Education

B.S. in Mathematics with a minor in Chemistry

Barry University, Miami, FL

 

Ph.D. Chemistry 

University of California and San Diego State University

 

An experimental and theoretical study of the thermodynamic properties of aqueous electrolytes at very high temperatures and pressures

Expertise

I would like to continue an interdisciplinary approach of science and engineering to understand important theoretical and practical problems that remain fundamental scientific challenges. The objective of my research is to develop the experimental data and a theoretical understanding needed to describe the thermodynamic behavior of aqueous and mixed solvent electrolyte solutions of environmental and industrial interest at extreme temperatures and pressures. These properties of solutions at high temperatures and pressures are of enormous economic importance.

Thermodynamic data for chemical reactions in high temperature solutions are important in several scientific and industrial applications including oil/gas, geochemistry, deep-ocean hydrothermal vents, oceanography, biochemistry, hydrometallurgy, electric power plant operation, water desalination and all industrial processes that are concerned with the use of high temperature solutions. The novelty in the work lies in the very extreme conditions being studied and the potential for identifying unusual effects.

My research interest lies within the field of experimental/theoretical physical inorganic chemistry. I utilize the techniques of calorimetry to probe the thermodynamic properties of above-mentioned systems. While thermodynamic data can be used directly in the design of chemical processes, it is impractical to make measurements on all mixtures of interest and at all required compositions. One area of particular interest is the development of predictive models for the thermodynamic quantities of chemical reactions that take place in high-temperature solutions.

My general research interest is to explore the following areas of study:

·      Thermodynamic Properties of Simple and Multicomponent Electrolytes in Aqueous and Mixed Solvent System to Extreme Temperatures and Pressures

·      Molecular Modeling of Ion Solvation and Thermodynamics in Aqueous and Mixed Solvent Solution at Extreme Temperatures and Pressures

·      Preferential Solvation of ions in Aqueous/Organic Mixed Solvent Systems

·      Effects of Hydrate Inhibitors on the Solubility of Scale Minerals in Produced Water

·      Prediction of the Solubility of Simple and Multi-component Electrolytes in Mixed Aqueous Organic Solvents to Extreme Temperatures

·      Biological and Natural Microbial Communities

·      Thermodynamic efficiency of the reef-associated marine microbial food web

 

Publications

Peer-Reviewed (* indicates corresponding author)

 

Thermodynamic Properties and Solubility of Sodium and Potassium Chloride in Ethane-1,2 diol/Water Mixed Solvent Systems to High Temperatures 

Essmaiil Djamali,* Mason B. Tomson, Walter G. Chapman

J. Chem. Eng. Data 2017, 62, 1326-1334.

 

A Systematic Investigation of the Thermodynamic Properties of Aqueous Barium Sulfate to   Extreme Temperatures and Pressures

Essmaiil Djamali,* Walter G. Chapman, Kenneth R. Cox

J. Chem. Eng. Data 2016, 61, 3585−3594.

 

Extensions of the SAFT Model for Complex Association in the Bulk and Interface

Wael A Fouad, Amin Haghmoradi, Le Wang, Artee Bansal, Ali Al Hammadi, Dilip Asthagiri, Essmaiil Djamali, Kenneth R Cox, Walter G Chapman*

Fluid Phase Equilibria 2016, 416, 62-71.

 

Prediction of the Standard State Partial Molar Volume of Aqueous Electrolytes to High Temperatures and High Pressures

            Essmaiil Djamali,* Walter G. Chapman, Kenneth R. Cox

J. Chem. Eng. Data 2015, 60, 3792-3799

 

A Priori Prediction of the Thermodynamic Properties of Electrolytes in Mixed Aqueous-Organic Solvents to Extreme Temperatures

Essmaiil Djamali,* Amy T. Kan, Mason B. Tomson

 J. Phys. Chem. B 2012, 116, 9033−9042.

 

Effects of Hydrate Inhibitors on the Solubility of Barite and Halite in Produced Water

Essmaiil Djamali,* Haiping Lu, Amy T. Kan, Mason B. Tomson

SPE International Conference on Oilfield Scale, 2012.

 

Heat Output by Marine Microbial and Viral Communities

Essmaiil Djamali, Peter J. Turner, James Nulton, Forest Rohwer and Peter Salamon*

Journal of Non-Equilibrium Thermodynamics 2012, 37 (3), 291-313.

 

Thermodynamic Properties of aqueous Polyatomic Ions at Extreme Temperatures and Pressures

Essmaiil Djamali,* James W. Cobble

J. Phys. Chem. B 2010, 114, 3887-3893.

 

Solubility Constant for Lithium Metaborate in Acid Solutions at Extreme Temperatures and Pressures

Essmaiil Djamali,* Peter J. Turner

J. Solution Chem. 2010, 39, 820-827.

 

A High-Temperature High-Pressure Calorimeter for Determining Heats of Solution up to 623 K

Essmaiil Djamali,* Peter J. Turner, Richard C. Murray, James W. Cobble

Rev. Sci. Instrum. 2010, 81, 075105.

 

The Standard State Thermodynamic Properties for Completely Ionized Hydrochloric acid and Ionization of Water up to 523 K

Essmaiil Djamali*

J. Chem. Thermodynamics 2009, 41, 872-879.

 

Standard State Thermodynamic Properties of Aqueous Cesium Chloride using High Dilution Calorimetry up to 598.15 K 

Essmaiil Djamali,* Keith Chen and James W. Cobble*

J. Chem. Thermodynamics 2009, 41, 992-999.

 

Standard State Thermodynamic Properties of Aqueous Sodium Perrhenate using High Dilution Calorimetry up to 598.15 K 

Essmaiil Djamali,* Keith Chen and James W. Cobble*

J. Chem. Thermodynamics 2009, 41, 1035-1041.

 

High Dilution Calorimetric Determination of the Standard State Thermodynamic Differences Between the Properties of H+(aq) and Na+(aq) up to 598.15 K

Essmaiil Djamali,* James W. Cobble*

J. Chem. Thermodynamics 2009, 41, 1284-1291.

 

Standard State Thermodynamic Properties of Completely Ionized Aqueous Sodium Sulfate using High Dilution Calorimetry up to 598.15 K

Essmaiil Djamali,* Keith Chen and James W. Cobble*

J. Phys. Chem. B 2009, 113, 11688-11695.

 

Standard State Thermodynamic Properties of Ba2+(aq), Co2+(aq) and Cu2+(aq) up to 598.15 K, and Temperature Effect on Ligand Field

Essmaiil Djamali,* Keith Chen, Richard C. Murray, Jr., Peter J. Turner and James W. Cobble*

J. Phys. Chem. B 2009, 113 (8), 2404-2408.

 

Thermodynamic Properties of Aqueous Gadolinium Perrhenate and Gadolinium Chloride from High Dilution Calorimetry at Extreme Temperatures and Pressures

Essmaiil Djamali,* James W. Cobble*

J. Phys. Chem. B 2009, 113 (8), 2409-2413.

 

Standard State Thermodynamic Properties of Aqueous Sodium Chloride using High Dilution Calorimetry at Extreme Temperatures and Pressures

Essmaiil Djamali,* James W. Cobble*

J. Phys. Chem. B 2009, 113 (15), 5200-5207.

 

Standard State Thermodynamic Properties of Completely Dissociated Hydrochloric Acid and Aqueous Sodium Hydroxide at Extreme Temperatures and Pressures

Essmaiil Djamali,* James W. Cobble*

J. Phys. Chem. B 2009, 113 (31), 10792-10799.

 

 

A Unified Theory of the Thermodynamic Properties of Aqueous Electrolytes to Extreme Temperatures and Pressures

Essmaiil Djamali,* James W. Cobble*

J. Phys. Chem. B 2009, 113 (8), 2398-2404.

 

Book Chapters

“Electrolyte solutions: Standard state partial molar enthalpies of solution and enthalpies of dilution”, In: Enthalpy and Internal Energy, edited by Emmerick Wilhelm and Trevor Letcher. Royal Society of Chemistry, 2017. Essmaiil Djamali,* Walter G. Chapman    

 

Grant Funding

Title:               The Heat is On: Novel Instrumentation to Estimate the Energy that Small Numbers of Microbial Cells Produce

 

Grant:             Gordon & Betty Moore Foundation’s Marine Microbiology Initiative (MMI)

 

Role:               Co-Principal Investigator

 

Amount:        $541,069.00

 

Years:            02/2017-08/2018

 

 

 

   

 

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