Student interning for Homeland Security

Mickey Da Silva researching quick power restoration

Mickey Da Silva, a physics and chemistry major from Newbury Park, began his internship at the Naval Research Laboratory in Washington, D.C., on June 1 and will continue through Aug. 7.

(WASHINGTON, D.C. – June 30, 2015) A California Lutheran University student is working to develop a system to restore power after natural disasters through a Department of Homeland Security Summer Fellowship.

Mickey Da Silva, a physics and chemistry major from Newbury Park, began his internship at the Naval Research Laboratory in Washington, D.C., on June 1 and will continue through Aug. 7.

Da Silva is researching wireless power transfer over long distances that could be applied in response to natural disasters. He is developing a system that could restore power to a large area in less than 12 hours. He has written a paper and produced a slideshow presentation that has been reviewed by some of the top researchers in the field. He is now building a mock-up, fabricating the needed parts.

The Homeland Security Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics Summer Internship Program is providing Da Silva with a $6,000 stipend and travel expenses.

The program offers undergraduate and graduate students quality research experiences at federal facilities throughout the country and opportunities to connect with Department of Homeland Security staff and partners. It is designed to engage a diverse, educated and skilled pool of scientists and engineers in the field’s issues and enhance the available workforce.

Da Silva also recently received a $5,000 scholarship as a Rossing Physics Scholar – Honorable Mention for the 2015-2016 year. The Evangelical Lutheran Church in America Foundation awards the competitive scholarships to exemplary physics students chosen from the 26 universities affiliated with the church.

A Thousand Oaks High School graduate, Da Silva received a Regent’s Scholarship from Cal Lutheran and is co-president of the campus Physics Club. Last summer, he researched electron-rich polymer synthesis and methods through an Amgen grant and he presented his research in the fall at the 11th Annual Student Research Symposium at Cal Lutheran. He is minoring in math.

Da Silva is also accomplished in the arts. The recipient of a music scholarship, he left for the Washington, D.C., internship after performing with the Cal Lutheran Choir throughout Germany in May. He has played viola in the Honors String Ensemble and University Symphony and will play violin in the groups next year.

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