The CLU Writing Center

Multiliteracy Space

The CLU Writing Center aligns its literacy education practices with the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE) and promotes multiliteracy practices on campus.

The NCTE Definition of 21st Century Literacies

Literacy has always been a collection of cultural and communicative practices shared among members of particular groups. As society and technology change, so does literacy. Because technology has increased the intensity and complexity of literate environments, the 21st century demands that a literate person possess a wide range of abilities and competencies, many literacies. These literacies are multiple, dynamic, and malleable. As in the past, they are inextricably linked with particular histories, life possibilities, and social trajectories of individuals and groups. Active, successful participants in this 21st century global society must be able to

  • Develop proficiency and fluency with the tools of technology;

  • Build intentional cross-cultural connections and relationships with others so to pose and solve problems collaboratively and strengthen independent thought;

  • Design and share information for global communities to meet a variety of purposes;

  • Manage, analyze, and synthesize multiple streams of simultaneous information;

  • Create, critique, analyze, and evaluate multimedia texts;

  • Attend to the ethical responsibilities required by these complex environments.

(Multiliteracy projects will be announced and updated in Fall 2014.)

Scholarship:

Multiliteracy Centers: Writing Center Work, New Media and Multimodal Rhetoric (David Sheridan, James Inman)

The Idea of a Multiliteracy Center: Six Responses

Multiliteracy Tutoring at Emory University

Multiliteracies Centers:

Michigan Tech Universiity

CSU-Channel Island

Conferences:

Community Writing: http://www.communitywriting.org/

Digital Humanities Summer Institute

 

 

 

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