Virtual Festival of Scholars

April 27 – May 1, 2020

Schedule of Events


Graduate School of Education Poster Symposium


Student Abstracts

Student(s):
Kristen Acosta

Faculty Mentor:
Dr. Maura Martindale

Disability Services in Higher Education
View abstract

The issue of Disability Services effectiveness at the college level with regard to graduation rates of college students with disabilities has been a concern with how to measure it effectively. The connection between reasonable accommodations a student has been entitled to and academic success has varied with regard to institutional setting, students registered with Disability Services and the student’s utilization of services of which they have been made eligible. The amount of research that focuses on graduation rates with regard to institutional expectations, the diversity of student demographics, disability type, and how long it took students to graduate from a postsecondary institution is limited. The purpose of this study is to inform professionals in higher education to consider how to make disability services at postsecondary institutions more effective for this population, specifically, the process of determining how many reasonable accommodations are appropriate for each individual student in order for them to graduate within a reasonable amount of time. In order to determine this, an extended literature review was conducted to determine what factors contributed to college students with disabilities disclosing their disability to their institution, effective utilization of their services, how their experiences impacted their ability to connect to their institution, and degree completion. The results of this study will be presented at the festival of scholars.


Student(s):
Ryan Akers

Faculty Mentor:
Prof. Juliet Lee

Military and Veteran Student's Perception of Internships in College
View abstract

Military and veteran students are understudied and face difficulties different than traditional college students. The purpose of this study is to gain a better viewpoint of military and veteran students’ perspectives of internships in college. Through a Qualitative phenomenological study, 8 military and veteran students will be individually interviewed. Preliminary findings suggest that military and veteran students face transition difficulties when leaving a military environment and transitioning to a college or university. The significance of this study is to expand career professionals' overall knowledge on how to appropriately support this population and explore commonalities among similar experiences regarding this student population.

View presentation poster


Student(s):
Rachel Alexander

Faculty Mentor:
Dr. Lorynn Selby

Multisensory Sight Word Instruction with English Learners
View abstract

           This research study seeks to determine the effectiveness of multisensory sight word instruction with first grade EL students. The study questions if sight word acquisition increases when students are explicitly taught using multisensory techniques. English Learners and students with low socioeconomic status suffer from low reading achievement and their challenges with reading success is an ongoing concern. The purpose of this research study is to compare sight word instruction using two different instructional methods. The study compares instruction from the 2018/2019 school year, where students were explicitly taught sight words using a read-spell-read flashcard method, to the 2019/2020 school year, when the classrooms began introducing sight words with a multisensory instructional approach. To complete the study, quantitative data was collected from first grade report cards to explain the correlational relationship between student test scores on sight word recognition from both academic years. The numerical data strived to explain the correlation between the instructional approach and the percentage of correctly read sight words. Qualitative data, in the form of teacher interviews, was collected to enhance the quantitative data to understand why the numerical data findings were what they were, to understand students’ response to instruction, and how the instructional approaches resonated with student motivation. The results hope to answer the research questions as to whether or not sight word acquisition increases with the use of a multi-sensory introduction and whether mnemonic cues increase class motivation and self-efficacy.


Student(s):
Alicia Alvarez

Faculty Mentor:
Prof. Kathleen Merrigan

Teacher and Administrators Perceptions of Social Emotional Learning in a Low Socio-Economic High School
View abstract

Within the last twenty years social-emotional learning (SEL) has emerged in a tremendous  fashion. Today, SEL focuses to teach students to be self-aware and prepare them for life after high school. Research has proven how social, economic and environmental risk factors can negatively influence adolescents' mental health. Mental health disorders have the ability to disrupt students daily function. The purpose of this study was to explore teacher and administrators perceptions on the impact social-emotional learning may or may not have at a low socio-economic high school. This qualitative case study utilized teacher and administrators questionnaires and interviews to identify teacher and administrators perceptions of SEL. The results of this study revealed the majority of high school teachers have little knowledge of what social-emotional learning is and have not had adequate training on how to implement it in the classroom. 
            
 


Student(s):
Katelyn Amezquita

Faculty Mentor:
Dr. Maura Martindale

Language and Literacy using Desired Results Developmental Profile for Deaf/Hard of Hearing Students
View abstract

The Desired Results Developmental Profile (2015) is a formative assessment for children from early infancy up to kindergarten. This assessment is used by teachers and service providers to inform instruction and program development. The purpose of this study was to gain knowledge on where children with a hearing loss and typical hearing children in preschool are in relation to one another in the language and literacy domain using the DRDP (2015). The researcher used results already gathered that were given to the district by the Deaf and Hard of Hearing teachers and the Early Education preschool teachers. A group comparison was used to compare the 2019 Fall DRDP (2015) results of 15 deaf and hard of hearing children and 15 typical hearing children in their preschool setting. The results showed similarities and differences in academic achievement for the language and literacy developmental measurement in the DRDP (2015).


Student(s):
Carmen Ayala

Faculty Mentor:
Dr. Daniel Tillapaugh

Cultural Values and First Generation Latino Parental Involvement in Middle School
View abstract

Research has found that parental involvement has a significant influence on students and their academic success. Furthermore, researchers have found that parental involvement consists of many variables that affect the degree of impact parents have on their children. My study focuses on first-generation Latino parents and the ways that their cultural values influence their parental involvement in their child’s education. Given that first-generation Latino families often find themselves with many barriers in the educational system, such as the language barrier and/or no one providing a welcoming and understanding environment, there are often difficulties in understanding Latino parents’ involvement in K-12 education. As a result, I conducted a qualitative narrative study to examine Latino parents’ involvement and how their cultural values mediate the lessons they instill in their child’s life around education. I facilitated a focus group with first-generation Latino families whose children attend one specific middle school in Southern California, gaining their personal stories about education and parental involvement experiences through their cultural values. The significance of this study is to help K-12 educators promote formal and informal parental involvement and, eventually, student academic success for Latino students. Furthermore, this information can help equip school leaders to disrupt assumptions, stereotypes, and biases around first-generation Latino parents’ involvement in their child’s education and advocate for structural change that can create more equitable outcomes for Latino families in K-12 educational contexts, such as increased bilingual staff members and teachers and affirming Latino cultural values within schools. 


Student(s):
Chloe Baade

Faculty Mentor:
Dr. Lory Selby

Strategies to Increase Participation in the Inclusive Elementary Music Classroom
View abstract

Students with disabilities are mainstreamed into the general education music classroom every day. Ensuring participation and meeting the needs of all learners is a daunting task that all music teachers must take on. Research has shown that music teachers feel underprepared at dealing with problem behaviors and working with students with special needs. This study will seek to identify strategies and activities that increase participation for students with special needs in the integrated elementary school music classroom. This study was conducted by surveying music teachers in an elementary school district. Findings from this study indicate specific music activities that are best for engaging students, and the effect of relationships on participation. Common themes include: group activities, ukulele activities, and singing. Relationships and setting clear expectations were also shown to make a significant difference in the participation of students with disabilities in the music classroom.


Student(s):
Michelle Baum

Faculty Mentor:
Prof. Juliet Lee

Secondary Teacher's Perception and Implementation of the Next Generation Science Standards
View abstract

The Next Generation Science Standards emphasize student centered active learning, a drastic shift from direct instruction. Despite the Next Generation Science Standards adoption in 2013, not all educators utilize the science standards in their teaching practice. Through the extended literature review I aimed to examine secondary science teachers' perception of the Next Generation Science Standards and how their perceptions impact their implementation of the standards. The findings reflect that there is a positive correlation of the data with a possible causation link that teacher’s perceptions impact the likelihood of the implementation of the Next Generation Science Standards This study aims to inform teachers how their personal perceptions can impact their practice as educators. Further research needs to be completed. 

View presentation poster
Watch presentation video


Student(s):
Nazareth Bautista

Faculty Mentor:
Dr. Maura Martindale

Transfer Shock: Latino Students 
View abstract

California has the largest community college system of higher education in the country with Latino students making up the majority of the student population (California Community Colleges Chancellor’s Office, 2019). Roughly 30 percent of those Latino community college students transfer to a four-year institution within two years (The Campaign for College Opportunity, 2015). However, the graduation rate of those transfer students from the four-year is dismal. 23 percent graduate from a CSU and 49 percent graduate from a UC within two years (The Campaign for College Opportunity, 2015). The purpose of this casual comparative study is to analyze the “transfer shock” Latino community college students face at their receiving institution post-transfer. “Transfer shock” refers to a transfer student’s severe drop in academic performance during the first or second semester at the receiving institution (Hills, 1965). An ex post facto design was implemented utilizing pre-existing data that was collected and available internally. No identifiable information was included in the data, ensuring confidentiality. The results of this study aim to answer the following question: what factors lead to transfer shock among Latino community college transfer students at their receiving four-year institution?


Student(s):
Teresa Blum

Faculty Mentor:
Prof. Richard Underhill

Examining a Need for a Per-college Summer Program: For Student with Specific Learning Disabilities
View abstract

Students with learning disabilities are entering college in greater numbers but only a small percentage of them are likely to complete a degree.  Similar to other marginalized groups, students with learning disabilities feel isolated from their peers without disabilities, creating barriers to success.  Bias against their disabilities and social exclusion are impacting to these students. Critical supports include: academics, self-advocacy, social support, and financial aid.  By attending and/or completing college, students with learning disabilities achieve a more positive career outlook.  This research study examines the amount of support students with specific learning disabilities receive in high school to prepare for college, their transition to college, and the impact to their ability to complete higher education.  The primary objective is to determine if an early pre-college intervention program can increase college retention and graduation rates for students with specific learning disabilities.  A phenomenologicalqualitative research method was used to allow the researcher to interpret personal experiences of the participants with regards to their personal experiences.  Using one-on-one interviews with current and former college students with specific learning disabilities, the researcher asked questions pertaining to high school assistance for attending college, transition to college, knowledge of college disability support services, self-advocacy, and other supports that may have helped them in their college endeavors.  The results should indicate that a pre-college program can increase college preparation and persistence for students with specific learning disabilities.  Supports best needed to be successful are identified from the results. 


Student(s):
Colin Borden

Faculty Mentor:
Dr. Lory Selby

Differentiating the Argumentative Writing Process
View abstract

As public schools in the United States become increasingly diverse, teachers have to differentiate the learning process to meet each student’s learning needs. Differentiated instruction can be applied in a variety of ways and contexts. This study is narrowed to examine the impacts of differentiating the argumentative writing process to sixth grade students’ personal interests by providing them with topics to choose from when completing argumentative writing assignments.
The purpose of this study is to examine the impacts of the differentiating argumentative writing process to students’ personal interests in comparison with their written arguments that are not aligned with their personal interests. How will students perform in both of these contexts? Will differentiation according to their personal interests empower them to perform better and have a higher score based off of the school district’s argumentative writing rubric?  
The methodology used for this study consists of a qualitative comparative analysis. Students will be given two writing assignments. One argumentative writing assignment that they will complete is the general argumentative writing benchmark assignment that sixth grade students are required to complete by the school district. The other assignment that they will be given consists of four different popular topics of choice  that they will choose from. Students written products for both assignments will be scored using the school district’s argumentative writing rubric. Each students’ two essay scores will then be compared across each category of the rubric.


Student(s):
Myriah Brennan

Faculty Mentor:
Prof. Kathleen Merrigan

Case Study on the Effectiveness of Empathy as an Intervention to Decrease Bullying
View abstract

Bullying in schools is a very current and relevant issue today. There is a large amount of research highlighting the many negative possible outcomes for students who are victims of bullying, as well as those who perpetrate the bullying, and those who witness the bullying. While some research on this topic attempts to determine what attributes increase an individual’s likelihood to bully others, it is not completely clear, and therefore, finding the appropriate and most effective intervention is difficult. The purpose of this case study is to gain a better understanding of teacher and school staff perspectives on the effectiveness of utilizing empathy-focused interventions in addressing bullying behaviors. This qualitative case study utilized staff questionnaires, behavior observations in the classroom and in large groups, and document data from office referrals within a K-5 setting. Results demonstrate that there are some inconsistencies between what bullying behaviors staff believe to be the biggest concern and what is being documented within the schools. While all staff members expressed that empathy is a beneficial aspect of bullying intervention, empathy-focused interventions were not typically mentioned when staff were asked to explain the interventions they use with students. Further research is recommended to explore or inquire about effective ways to teach school staff to implement empathy-focused interventions with students.
 


Student(s):
Jenna Burge

Faculty Mentor:
Prof. Juliet Lee

English Language Learners' Perceptions of Instructional Strategies in Secondary Level Mathematics Classes
View abstract

Within a variety of schools across the United States, teachers often implement specific instructional strategies designed to help English Language Learners achieve success in a mathematics class. There is much research dedicated to distinguishing which English Language Learner instructional strategies are found to be the most effective from a teacher’s perspective.  However, few research studies examine English Language Learner student preferences of effective instructional strategies in a mathematics classroom. Methods involved collecting and analyzing findings from databases that aim to examine effective instructional strategies and examine English Language Learner preferences and perceptions of instructional strategies in a secondary level mathematics class. Findings will enable researchers and other professionals in the educational community to gain further insight towards English Language Learner perceptions of instructional strategies in a secondary level mathematics class.

View presentation poster


Student(s):
Yamilex Chavez

Faculty Mentor:
Dr. Richard Underhill

Parent Involvement within Dual Language Education
View abstract

Dual Language Education (DLE) programs have shown success specifically with student academic achievement, as it has been proven through educational research. Yet, what are the underlying factors that result in DLE programs being successful? While certain factors might be the underlying reasons to the success of DLE programs the current research focuses on the specific factor of parent involvement. Through a qualitative research design, data has been gathered through semi-structured interviews of elementary teachers who educate in DLE programs. The analysis of the data will determine whether parent involvement in DLE programs is an underlying factor as to why these programs demonstrate longitudinal positive success. Overall, this research will benefit the general field of educational research as a current research gap is found within parent involvement and DLE programs. Additionally, the research will benefit the development and improvement of DLE programs as well as other educational programs as it will determine if parental involvement feeds into the success of DLE programs.


Student(s):
Meagan Chew

Faculty Mentor:
Prof. Juliet Lee

Student Perceptions of the Next Generation Science Standards
View abstract

Science instructional methods have shifted from lecture and textbook to an emphasis on hands-on learning and student discovery with the emergence of the Next Generation Science Standards in 2013.  Student perceptions of hands-on activities affects their participation and engagement; however, the implementation of strategies suggested by the Next Generation Science Standards may not align with students’ preferences.  Through a secondary data analysis, this study will explore which instructional strategies students have self-identified as most helpful in the science classroom, as well as investigate whether these align with the emphasis on scientific inquiry and investigation presented in the Next Generation Science Standards.  Data related to student perceptions of science instructional strategies is minimal.  Therefore, this study addresses students’ opinions of the ways they best learn in a science classroom and how they acquire scientific knowledge.
 
 

View presentation poster


Student(s):
Lesley Davis

Faculty Mentor:
Prof. Juliet Lee

Upward Bound Candidates and Influence on STEM Careers
View abstract

There is a significant need for the population of individuals who seek careers in the fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics to match the overall demographics of the population of the United States. TRIO programs address the lack of diversity in such fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics by creating support for underrepresented populations.  Using a quantitative analysis of a survey of TRIO participants in careers, the findings in this study will reveal which supports most assist students in retaining science careers. The most important finding is the need for further development in the realm of self-efficacy and mentorships. The significance of this study is to help TRIO programs support student advancement in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics careers. 
 

View presentation poster


Student(s):
Westley Fairall

Faculty Mentor:
Richard Underhill

Teacher-Coach Perspective on the Effects of the Coach-Athlete Dynamic in the Classroom Abstract
View abstract

Secondary schools tend to be composed of two primary spheres: academics, with the primary responsibility of schools being to educate their students and prepare them with a baseline of knowledge with which to tackle the post-high school world, and extracurricular activities such as sports or clubs, which for many students provides the motivation to show up to school and stay above the qualifying academic threshold. This study focuses on the effects of hiring employees to fit the dual role of teacher and coach through the lens of teacher-coaches who engage with students in both academic and athletic capacities. A notable correlation between coaching and strong academic relationships between teachers and student athletes would be beneficial to the hiring process of school districts aiming to excel in both the academic and athletic spheres. This study was conducted through interviews with teacher-coaches analyzing their own experiences teaching, coaching, how each role affected the other, and their experiences working with students who they also coached. The results of this study serve as useful information for hiring committees, as well as cross-curricular incentive for teachers to professionally engage with students in a capacity outside of their classroom.


Student(s):
Kori Farrell

Faculty Mentor:
Dr. Daniel Tillapaugh

The Use of Self-compassion as a Self-care Tool for Graduate Counselor Education Students
View abstract

In graduate school programs, it has been revealed that graduate students are experiencing high levels of stress because of continually performing balancing acts to fulfill their daily routines (Burke, Dye, & Hughey, 2016; Martinez, Ordu, Della Sala, & McFarlane, 2013; Nicklin, Meachon, & McNall, 2018). These responsibilities may include working full-time/part-time, attending classes, completing schoolwork, completing internship hours, and personal demands. The purpose of this study was to learn more about how self-compassion techniques could influence the experiences of counselor education graduate students while completing their programs. To complete this narrative qualitative study, I conducted one 90-minute focus group with two counselor education graduate students to understand how they used self-compassion techniques within their academic endeavors in Spring 2020. The significance of this study is to help individuals, particularly those who are emerging educational counselors who are engaged in helping roles for others, adopt more life-long, self-compassion strategies and move away from hurtful self-judgment and self-criticizing behaviors. If counselor education students practiced self-compassion towards themselves, then they could also extend this into their counseling and other roles they serve post-graduation.  


Student(s):
Thalia Fernandez

Faculty Mentor:
Prof. Kathleen Merrigan

SpEd and GenEd Teacher Knowledge and Implementation of Evidence-based Behavior Management Strategies
View abstract

Understanding how to apply evidence-based behavior management strategies to maintain a functional classroom environment for students to learn in is essential in the educational field. Evidence-based behavior management strategies are strategies used to decrease inappropriate behaviors and increase appropriate behaviors. The amount of training, knowledge and how often teachers implement behavior management strategies in their classrooms is a huge factor in how efficiently classrooms are run and how well students are able to learn in the classroom environment. The primary purpose of this study was to examine how knowledgeable general education teachers and special education teachers feel about evidence-based behavior management strategies. The secondary purpose of this study was to identify which behavior management strategies are being utilized in secondary classrooms and how often general education teachers and special education teachers implement behavior management strategies in their classrooms. A qualitative case-study design was used for this study to allow common themes to be found from responses of the surveys and interviews used.
 


Student(s):
Elizabeth Fictum

Faculty Mentor:
Dr. Lorynn Selby

Student Perceptions of School Climate Following Participation in Proactive Circles
View abstract

As the use of restorative practices has expanded in schools across the United States, so has the body of research on these practices. Most studies have focused on the relationship between restorative practices and rates of suspension. Fewer studies have examined the relationship between restorative practices and school climate. This study seeks to fill the gap in existing research by examining student perceptions of school climate following completion of restorative practices. More specifically, this study will look at student attitudes towards themselves, their peers, and their teacher following completion of proactive circles. This study took the form of a qualitative case study. Students from a single third-grade classroom participated in semi-structured interviews after completing a proactive circle. Interview responses were recorded and transcribed. The transcribed responses were then coded, and larger themes were developed.


Student(s):
Caitlyn Gintjee

Faculty Mentor:
Richard Underhill

Exploration of Student Empowerment Post High School Career and/or Education
View abstract

Student empowerment can be defined as a positive or growth mindset, a habit of inquiry as well as the belief and confidence that they have control over their own learning/life and are capable of changing their surroundings. The progression of student empowerment research started with defining the term, to identifying factors in which to nurture empowerment and ending with the outcomes for primary and secondary education. The purpose of this study is to explore the next stage in the progression, the long-lasting impact of student empowerment post-high school careers or higher education. The study will focus on the long-lasting impact of empowerment, and more specifically, teachers who are alumni of an empowered school. How successful and happy are those who come from an empowering school?  The study is a qualitative research conducted through interviews with three participants, who are teachers as well as alumni of a focused school. 


Student(s):
Karina Gonzalez

Faculty Mentor:
Dr. Lorynn Selby

The Mindfulness Effect
View abstract

The importance of The Mindfulness Effect is for society to hopefully understand that it is important for teachers to implement mindfulness. The research question is as stated: What is the effect that mindfulness implementation has on students’ attitudes or behaviors in elementary classrooms? SEL (Social Emotional Learning) is a very popular topic in the educational atmosphere. Mindfulness is part of SEL and may be beneficial to many students. The purpose of this research project is to help teachers determine if they would like to implement mindfulness in their classroom. In this study, teachers (TK-6th grade) at Central Coast School*, participated in a survey, which asked questions based on the effect of mindfulness that they include in their own class. The goal of this research project was to analyze what effect mindfulness implementation has on students’ attitudes or behaviors in the classroom. The study used a quantitative research method. This was a compatible fit for the proposed study because there was only one area of focus, which was mindfulness. The design of this quantitative method approach was the nonexperimental quantitative design. This type of approach includes no manipulation to the variables. This is a descriptive type of research and interpretations are made about individuals and settings. (Mertler, 2019). According to the results, the majority of the participants answered that they viewed mindfulness strategies/implementation as moderately effective.
 
 


Student(s):
Czarina Gutierrez

Faculty Mentor:
Dr. Daniel Tillapaugh

Breaking the Mold: Supporting Post-Traditional Students
View abstract

Higher education was originally created for students to attend right after high school (McFadden, 2011), but now more than ever, colleges and universities are seeing an increase in adult students returning to further their education (Chen, 2017). Adult returning students are known as post-traditional students, and with their increase presence on college campuses, it is important for higher education professionals to understand their diverse needs including their motivations, responsibilities, and experiences differ from the traditional student type (Soares, 2013; Soares, Steele, & Wayt, 2016). Within my particular study, I used a qualitative approach through conducting focus group sessions to hear about the experiences of current post-traditional students. I am analyzing the experiences of two different groups: post-traditional students in (1) a bachelor’s program geared specifically to their population versus (2) those in a traditional undergraduate program. The aim for this study is to see what factors benefit and hinder student success for post-traditional students. By hearing the first-hand experiences of current post-traditional students, higher education professionals can use this information to promote positive change. With respect to the field of higher education, this study will benefit educators and future post-traditional students. Understanding the areas that hinder and promote success for post-traditional students will help higher education professionals create beneficial programs and services to help increase retention and persistence levels among this population. This will not only benefit the retention and persistence levels for the institution, but it will also positively increase the validation post-traditional students feel on their respective campuses.
 


Student(s):
Kevin Habroun

Faculty Mentor:
Richard Underhill

The Most Effective Ways to Prepare New AP Teachers for Their First AP Class
View abstract

Advanced Placement (AP) classes are continuing to rise in popularity as competition grows amongst high school students to get into colleges.  From 2000 to 2019, the number of high schools offering AP classes has risen from over 13,000 to over 22,000, the number of students taking exams has risen from over 750,000 to nearly 3,000,000, and the number of AP exams taken by students has increased from just over one million to over five million (College Board, 2019). With this growth in the size and importance of AP programs, high schools are continuing to offer more AP classes.  It is crucial that new AP teachers are prepared to teach these rigorous courses, as their ability to prepare students for the AP test can have lasting effects on student success.  Much of the literature on AP teacher preparation focuses on APSI (Advanced Placement Summer Institute) trainings and AP Subject Workshops hosted by the College Board, however there is little else published about other ways for new AP teachers to prepare. The purpose of this study was to find the most effective ways to prepare new AP teachers.  Research was done through a qualitative study interviewing multiple AP teachers.  The results of this research will improve the preparedness of new AP teachers and provide them with resources and methods to help them build their skills and ensure student success both in their class and on the AP test.


Student(s):
Stephanie Hernandez

Faculty Mentor:
Prof. Kathleen Merrigan

Teachers Use of Strategies to Promote Social Emotional Competency among Deaf and Hard of Hearing Students
View abstract

 Social emotional competency serves as “building blocks for positive outcomes across the lifespan” (Walker & White, 2018, p. 4). Specifically among deaf and hard of hearing students (D/HH), social emotional competence is an essential component to a students’ successful development in the school setting. With the acknowledgement that teachers play an important role in fostering social emotional competency, the purpose of this study was to determine what strategies teachers of D/HH students implement to promote social emotional competency and to determine what social emotional skills teachers felt D/HH students lack most. This qualitative study utilized semi-structured interviews combined with field observations to determine teachers’ perspectives on deaf and hard of hearing students’ social emotional competency. The results of this study indicate that teachers do implement strategies to promote social emotional competency among D/HH students; however, it was also found that teachers’ implement a limited use of social emotional teaching strategies and resources specific to D/HH students. In addition, this research study highlights key information regarding the social emotional skills D/HH students lack according to their teachers.
 


Student(s):
Teodora Juarez

Faculty Mentor:
Prof. Kathleen Merrigan

Teachers’ Perspectives on Mindfulness-based Practices in the Classroom 
View abstract

The practice of mindfulness originated in the eastern part of the world and has gained significant popularity in the western hemisphere (Leland, 2015). Most recently mindfulness-based practices have worked their way into the elementary classroom, proving to enhance students’ social emotional learning skills, focus, self-control, and overall educational experience. As the topic of mindfulness continues to grow in the 21st century classroom and more teachers are required to implement the practice in their lessons, it’s still uncertain how teachers really feel about it. The purpose of this research study was to explore teachers’ perceptions of the effectiveness of mindfulness-based practices in a suburban elementary school, located in Southern California. Through a qualitative approach, teachers’ beliefs and experiences were measured using online surveys and semi-structured interviews. The results of this study demonstrated teachers positive stance on the overall concept of mindfulness; however, there were some common concerns regarding time and the ability to effectively implement the practice of mindfulness in the classroom. 


Student(s):
Nicole Lopez

Faculty Mentor:
Dr. Lori Selby

Measuring Collaborative learning in the Classroom
View abstract

The aim of the present research is to investigate the perceptions of collaborative, hands-on learning in Middle School Science classrooms. This quantitative research design used a Likert 5-point scale survey to study each participant’s perspective on integrating collaborative learning curriculum in the classroom. The data collection instruments for this research were composed of a survey that consisted of 14 questions. The researcher distributed the survey to ten middle school science teachers that were chosen based on their usage of NGSS and STEM curriculum in their classrooms. The researcher reviewed the responses from the participants in order to understand their perception of collaborative learning. The findings in this study provides inspirations and motivation for Middle School Science teachers to access their teaching methods, and examine how often they offer hands-on collaborative learning to motivate, and challenge 21st century learners. The Middle School Science departments will also be learning what teaching strategies work best at motivating learning in their classrooms.


Student(s):
Ysobella Lucareli

Faculty Mentor:
Dr. Lory Selby

Access to LGBTQ-Themed Literature in School Libraries
View abstract

Homophobic bullying has been an ongoing issue at both middle and high schools across the country (Orue & Calvete, 2018; Malo-Juvera, 2016; Thein, 2013). This bullying has severe, negative psychological effects on children at an impactful age in their lives (Birkett, Espelage, & Koenig, 2009). A way to combat homophobic bullying is to create safe learning environments that validate and are representative of all students, especially those in marginalized groups. LGBTQ-inclusive curriculum and literature has proved to help LGBTQ students to feel safe and accepted in their schools (Dinkins & Englert, 2015; Wickens, 2011; Page, 2017). Literature with LGBTQ characters and themes are helpful tools in starting conversations about the experiences that LGBTQ students face. However, many studies have shown that there are a lack of resources available to promote LGBTQ-inclusivity (Thein, 2013; Hall & Rodgers, 2018; Dinkins & Englert, 2015; Riggs, Rosenthal, & Smith-Bonahue, 2011). The following quantitative study analyzes the library of one middle school for LGBTQ-inclusive fiction and nonfiction literature to determine if the school is under-collecting LGBTQ texts. The methodology used in this study is based on previous research by Hughes-Hassel, Overberg, and Harris (2013) in which the researchers determined if 125 high schools in a Southern U.S. State were under-collecting LGBTQ-themed literature. Results from this study found that there were very few LGBTQ-themed texts available to students at the library, and there was minimal representation of LGBTQ literature compared to the library collection as a whole.


Student(s):
Brieanna Luna

Faculty Mentor:
Dr. Lorynn Selby

Homework Completion For High School Science Students
View abstract

Many teachers and education researchers believe that homework is a necessary and beneficial tool for a student's education, whether the student is in elementary school, in high school, or somewhere in between. Homework allows students to make mistakes and fix those mistakes before completing a higher-point assessment, such as a quiz, test, or project. Majority of high school teachers across the nation (regardless of the content area) are currently struggling with getting their students to complete their homework assignments.
The purpose of this research study is to analyze homework completion rates over a span of two school weeks. Analysis includes the rates of late, punctual, and missing homework assignments. Analysis also includes correlation of homework completion rates to type of homework assigned and student gender. A mixed-methods approach of both qualitative and quantitative data was used during the data collection process. A convience sampling method was also used in order to select participants.


Student(s):
Darby Marin

Faculty Mentor:
Dr. Maura Martindale

Modes of Communication Between Children Who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing and Hearing Siblings
View abstract

Families who have a child with a hearing loss face many obstacles when choosing a mode of communication that is successful for their family dynamic. Hearing children face similar obstacles when trying to build a relationship with their sibling who is deaf or hard of hearing.  This qualitative study focused on exploring modes of communication used in different families and how it affected sibling relationships. Published materials written by deaf or hard of hearing adults were gathered and analyzed to explore this phenomenon. The findings of this study may bring awareness about how chosen modes of communication impact family relationships.


Student(s):
Marissa Melgoza

Faculty Mentor:
Prof. Kathleen Merrigan

Technology Professional Development for Elementary School Teachers
View abstract

As new pedagogy, strategies, and technologies emerge and continue to rapidly evolve, teachers themselves must also evolve in order to fulfill their responsibility of teaching students 21st century skills. Teachers can learn to integrate technology though the support from the school district, school administration, and professionals in the form of professional development. However, are teachers equipped with the necessary skills to teach technology, integrate technology, and use technology? The purpose of this study was to explore teacher perceptions on the support they receive with technology professional development and their confidence with the implementation of technology. The research was done with mixed methods, using both surveys and interviews with elementary school teachers from a public Title 1 school. The findings demonstrated that teachers were well aware of the operation of the technology, but not all felt confident in the integration of the technology. However, it was found that most teachers were content with the technology professional development support they are offered by their school.
 
 
 


Student(s):
Lisa Misson

Faculty Mentor:
Dr. Maura Martindale

Perceptions of Career Readiness of Female Veterans Post Military Service
View abstract

Transitioning from military to civilian careers is a challenge for many veterans.  An extended literature review was conducted for the purpose of understanding the perceptions of career readiness of female veterans post military service. The existing research is scant as it relates to how prepared women veterans are to enter the civilian workforce. Issues with homelessness, unemployment, physical, mental health issues, and gender are barriers as highlighted throughout the current literature.  This analysis of the literature consists of articles from 2010 to 2019. The literature will shed light on the importance of how employers in the civilian workforce, educators, families, and social support networks can better assist female veterans during transitions.
 


Student(s):
Gillian Modlin

Faculty Mentor:
Dr. Maura Martindale

A Correlation between Test Scores and Students with Hearing Loss in an Inclusive Classroom
View abstract

Since the 1970s, there has been an increase in the number of students that are Deaf or Hard of Hearing (DHH) in an inclusive classroom setting. Due to this recent inclusive movement, there is an insufficient amount of data demonstrating if the inclusive setting is beneficial for DHH students and their academics. This study intended to fill this data gap. The purpose of this study was to look at five consecutive years of California state test scores and see if there is a correlation between test scores and the increase of DHH students in an inclusive setting. The study focused on one specific Los Angeles County elementary school with a high number of students that are DHH in an inclusive classroom setting. The researcher did not find a correlation between the test scores and the increased number of DHH students in an inclusion setting, leading to inconclusive results.


Student(s):
Veronica Mora

Faculty Mentor:
Dr. Maura Martindale

Standardized Testing and English as a Second Language
View abstract

This study explored the testing results for the English Language Proficiency Assessment for California (ELPAC) in grades K-5. This quantitative study analyzed the scores of English Language Learners comparing those who are and deaf or hard of hearing to those of their typical hearing peers. The study focuses on different testing accommodations that are provided on the ELPAC and other standardized tests to students who are deaf and or hard of hearing in comparison to those students that are typical hearing in a school setting. The ELPAC test results are presented in a format that separates students who receive any type of special service to those who do not. The findings of this student may bring awareness about how deaf and or hard of hearing students perform on tests in comparison to those who are typical hearing. 


Student(s):
Veronica Munoz

Faculty Mentor:
Dr. Lorynn Selby

First-Generation Latinas Pushing Forward in Higher Education
View abstract

Hispanics are the largest minority population in the U.S. With rates only increasing, it is vital that higher education learn how to successfully serve them. Studies show that Latina students are graduating college at a lower rate than their non-Latinx peers, but at a higher rate than Latino students. Another layer of identity that many Latinx students confront as they enter higher education is being a first-generation college student. This qualitative study aims to understand more about first-generation Latina college students. What do first-generation Latinas believe is assisting in their persistence, and also what could their college student personnel be doing better to support them? This study uses a strength based perspective focusing on the resilience and determination of first-generation Latina students. In an effort for the students to provide their perspectives and experiences this study plans to conduct a focus group with semi-structured questions to engage students and understand the details on a deeper level.


Student(s):
Ruben Napoles

Faculty Mentor:
Prof. Richard Underhill

Factors Influencing Special Education teacher Turnover and Retention
View abstract

As the number of students enrolling in special education programs continues to increase and the number of teachers available to teach those students continues to decrease, a void is created of qualified teachers available to teach students with special needs. The focus of this study is to identify the factors that initially contributed to the decision of four special education teachers to pursue a career in special education. Additionally, this study examines the factors that influenced those teachers' decisions to either stay, transfer, or leave the field of special education from a single district in a metropolitan region in a southwestern state. The turnover and retention factors of these special education teachers were examined through the retelling of their experiences as current and past special education teachers using a narrative inquiry approach. Allowing participants to tell their stories will offer critical details about their roles as special education teachers. Preliminary findings indicate that several factors are known to cause high turnover rates amongst novice special education teachers. These factors include lack of administrative support, large caseloads, lack of monetary compensation, and time spent working on paperwork. Factors that led to retention were small class sizes, adequate support from administration, and general education teachers. It is essential to continue to analyze the experiences of beginning special education teachers to determine what can be done to increase retention rates; thus, allowing districts to retain highly qualified special education teachers.
 


Student(s):
Maria Cristal Paniagua

Faculty Mentor:
Prof. Juliet Lee

Gen Z Engagement and Collaboration in the Math Classroom: Teachers’ Perspective in Implementing Technology
View abstract

The new generation of students found in the classroom today, Generation Z, has been connected online from a young age.  These students have not known a world without technology.  The amount of technology found in schools for this generation has increased tremendously, however few studies explore how technology has changed student engagement in the math classroom. Teachers implementing technology in the math classroom use a variety of online tools.  This qualitative study will conduct teacher interviews and classroom observations to see if there is a relationship between the use of technology-based social websites and engagement in the math classroom.  This is significant because it can provide insight into the role technology has and how to better use it for this generation of students that has a growth of accessibility in today’s classroom.  

View presentation poster


Student(s):
Gabriela Pantoja

Faculty Mentor:
Dr. Kathleen Merrigan

Anxiety and Social Media: Is There a Connection?
View abstract

Anxiety is both an emotion and disorder experienced by millions of children in the United States characterized by tension, worried thoughts, and physical changes.  The effects of such on a student’s educational experience, particularly in the formative years of Junior High, are immense.  Simultaneously, children are engaging in social media platforms, such as Facebook, Instagram, Snapchat, TikTok, Twitter, etc., at increasingly younger ages.  The implication of both entities on students’ educational experiences are nearly unfounded.  Therefore, the purpose of this qualitative phenomenological study was to explore the comorbidity of social media use and anxiety, and its effects on the academic performance of Junior High students in a Southern California high-socioeconomic parochial school.  Participants were asked to complete a digital questionnaire about their experiences with anxiety and social media, or lack thereof, in their daily lives.  Students who responded positively to both entities were asked to engage in focus groups to further delve into these topics.  The end-of-trimester grades of the focus group participants were analyzed to identify further trends between anxiety, social media use, and academic performance.  The end results of the study have not yet been determined, however, the data collected thus far does indicate a correlative nature.
 


Student(s):
Shannon Pearson

Faculty Mentor:
Dr. Maura Martindale

Educational Experiences of Students with Hearing Loss
View abstract

The history of education of people with hearing loss has been controversial and difficult. Even still, there are a variety of programs and language approaches available for this population, with no consensus on best practices or curriculums. With the advent of newer hearing technology, such as cochlear implants and digital hearing aids, barriers to entry into listening spoken language programs for students with hearing loss (SHL) were lessened, and a greater percentage of these students are now able to spend all or part of their days with their typically hearing peers. The purpose of this qualitative study was to examine the published experiences of students with hearing loss who had participated in listening and spoken language programs to provide educators of these programs with ideas to keep progress moving forward. The researcher collected stories shared by SHL in books and videos and coded the data to find common themes. The results showed one of the major themes was how school experiences help SHL construct self-identity. 


Student(s):
Kaitlyn Pitcher

Faculty Mentor:
Prof. Juliet Lee

The Effect of Restorative Justice on Social Emotional Learning in Suburban, Southern California Middle Schools
View abstract

Educators are seeing a negative shift in student behavior in middle schools and attribute this to the lack of social emotional skills learned in schools.  Restorative justice programs positively contribute to the social emotional skills that can be learned by students.  In having students reflect upon their actions or behaviors, it will increase the personal growth and problem solving abilities of the student and students invovled.  Through document analyses, the researcher hopes to support the idea that restorative justice programs have a positive impact on the behaviors of those students who were involved in the programs.  These programs address access and equity in education for those students who would have otherwise been removed from schools following disciplinary actions.  This study supports restorative justice programs in school districts who hope to increase social emotional awareness. 

View presentation poster


Student(s):
Patrick Price

Faculty Mentor:
Richard Underhill

The Impact of Teachers' Attitudes, Beliefs, and Practices on the Implementation of Inquiry-Based Learning in the Classroom
View abstract

Researchers and educational advocates have recognized the need to improve the quality of education in the areas of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) instruction (National Research Council, 2012.) Inquiry-based learning (IBL) is a holistic active learning strategy that has been shown to dramatically improve the academic achievement of students who are taught using these methods (Levy, Thomas, Drago, & Rex, 2013.) However, despite the benefits of using these practices, IBL pedagogy is still not commonly used in STEM classrooms (Lotter, Rushton, & Singer, 2013.) Furthermore, many of the efforts to train teachers to implement inquiry-based practices have not been effective, and have not adequately understood or addressed teachers’ attitudes, beliefs, and concerns relating to IBL practices (DiBiase & McDonald, 2015.) The purpose of this research will be to further explore the impact that the attitudes, beliefs, and instructional practices of teachers have on the use of IBL in the classroom using a case study approach in a Los Angeles area school district. This study will collect and examine interview narrations obtained from middle school STEM subject teachers in the district, which will then be analyzed using constant comparative methods. The results from this study will likely provide deeper insight into the relevant factors that impact the implementation of IBL practices within classrooms of the host school district. This information can then be used to provide professional development and support to facilitate the use of this beneficial approach to STEM education.


Student(s):
James Rumenapp

Faculty Mentor:
Prof. Kathleen Merrigan

Examining the Causes for Attrition and Retention in Secondary Instrumental Music Programs
View abstract

Keeping students involved in secondary-music education is often the biggest challenge for both Middle and High School music teachers. Frequently, students are being pulled in several directions by competing electives that are now being offered at their 9th grade level, or by struggling family situations where the cost of a quality music education suddenly becomes prohibitive. This is likely due to the newly offered afterschool marching band program, pep band, or perhaps the students have simply lost the willingness to learn and practice as the material became more difficult. The purpose of this research study is to determine the reasons why students may be quitting instrumental music programs once they reach high school. A multi-instrumented qualitative research design was utilized to find trends in the rationale of student attrition and retention in high school music instrumental music programs. The researcher conducted semi-structured interviews and surveys with open-ended questions with the intent to identify trends associated with attrition and retention.
            


Student(s):
Amanda Segovia

Faculty Mentor:
Katherine Merrigan

Special Education Teacher Supports and Retention Rate 
View abstract

New special education teachers and the retention rate of these teachers raises concerns. Special education teaching positions is currently a field with several vacancies and with some of the highest attrition rates. New special educators are leaving the field due to several factors including administration support, school climate, peer support, and lack of preparedness after completing credential programs. The purpose of this study was to look at the supports that benefitted veteran special education teachers. Understanding which supports benefit special education teachers will aid districts and credentialing programs in better supporting new teachers and lowering the high attrition rates. The present study utilized a qualitative case study through both surveys and interviews. Preliminary findings are showing, overall teachers are satisfied working in the field and the most beneficial supports being support from their departments, peers, and mentors. 
 
Keywords: Special education teachers, attrition, retention, administration support, job satisfaction, school climate, teacher preparation programs, new special education teachers, and mentors


Student(s):
Alia Sparling

Faculty Mentor:
Juliet Lee

Active Learning as it Relates to Elementary Intervention Curriculum
View abstract

Studies have shown that students often experience increased academic achievement when taught via active learning teaching methods. However, it has also been seen that active learning teaching methods are not common in elementary schools, which could be rooted in the way active learning teaching strategies are integrated into elementary curriculum. Through a curriculum analysis of elementary intervention instruction, Systematic Instruction in Phoneme Awareness, Phonics, and Sight Words curriculum, this study will identify and analyze the presence of active learning teaching strategies. It is anticipated that this study will reveal the types of, as well as the degree to which active learning teaching strategies are integrated into the curriculum. The results of this study have the potential to help educators to understand how active learning is currently integrated into elementary curriculum. By doing so, educators may  discover ways to support the implementation of active learning teaching strategies within elementary school classrooms via the curriculum being taught.

View presentation poster


Student(s):
Heather Tomaszewski

Faculty Mentor:
Prof. Juliet Lee

The Impact of Physical Education Class on Student Academic Achievement
View abstract

Time and energy is being taken away from physical education class in student scheduling, as well as physical education class not being taken seriously by students and education professionals. The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between physical activity and cognitive function in order to make connections between physical education class and a student’s academic ability. Through an extended literature review, conclusions will be found regarding the relationships between physical education class and student academic achievement. These findings will expand other educators’ understanding of the importance of physical education class.

Watch presentation video


Student(s):
Michael Trejo

Faculty Mentor:
Dr. Dan Tillapaugh

Community College Student Athletes’ Perceptions of Proper Compensation for Division I Student Athletes
View abstract

College athletics is a billion-dollar industry within the United States although the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) has specific rules and policies in place around athlete compensation.  However, very recently, there has been increased conversation about the student athlete compensation. The purpose of this study is to understand the perceptions of current student athletes at the community college level on the issue of player compensation for student athletes at the NCAA Division I level.  This would include compensation in the form of academic scholarships as well as payments for playing and media endorsements. Understanding player perceptions would be helpful in providing new insights for this substantial policy change in collegiate athletics that the NCAA is exploring. To complete this non-experimental quantitative study, I have distributed a researcher-developed survey to current student athletes at one community college in Southern California.  The significance of this study is to fill in the gaps regarding the issue of player compensation for student athletes at the NCAA Division I level and to understand how student athletes who may transfer to compete at the Division I level feel about the issue of student athlete compensation.  The implications of this study may be helpful for NCAA policy makers as well as athletic directors and the student athletes themselves in the controversial issue of player compensation.  


Student(s):
MacKenzie Vance

Faculty Mentor:
Prof. Juliet Lee

Teacher Perspectives of Social and Emotional Learning
View abstract

Social and emotional learning is a term encompassing learning how to manage and understand emotions, problem solving, and how to develop positive relationships with others. Over the last 30 years research on social and emotional learning has proven to be essential to improving student attitudes, grades, and improving their individual happiness. It has also become clear through research that there are roadblocks and misconceptions preventing teachers from implementing social and emotional learning in their classes. This is a case study of a single nonpublic special education school that will collect qualitative data through a series of observations and interviews with the teachers on campus. The data collected and presented here hopes to add to the teacher perspective and help better understand what teachers are currently doing and what they are not doing to implement social and emotional learning in their classes as well as what is preventing them from implementing social and emotional learning in their classes. 

View presentation poster


Student(s):
Antonio Vences

Faculty Mentor:
Prof. Juliet Lee

The effect ABA strategies have on Social Skills and Independence among middle school students with ASD 
View abstract

Individuals on the autism spectrum disorder have difficulty with social skills and independence which impact their ability to engage appropriately with others and work through their day-to-day lives without additional support. In order to combat these areas of need, students should receive effective evidence-based practices that will increase social skills and independence. Through an extended literature review, journal articles conclusions were made to find the effectiveness of applied behavior analysis as a teaching strategy to instruct these important skills to middle school students. Applied behavior analysis has been shown to be the most effective and efficient teaching strategy to instruct students, with autism spectrum disorder, social skills and independence skills.  WIth this data, teachers, service providers, and school psychologists can use these strategies to teach these important skills and impact the lives of students with autism spectrum disorder. 

 

View presentation poster


Student(s):
Kendahl Waalk

Faculty Mentor:
Dr. Daniel Tillapaugh

Impact of Mindfulness-Centered Pedagogy on Students in the Elementary School Setting
View abstract

In recent years, there has been an increase in the use of mindfulness programs within K-12 schools. In particular, mindfulness has been used to help students’ self-regulation (Bergen-Cico, Razza, & Timmins, 2015; Napoli, Krech, & Holley, 2005). The goal of incorporating whole child programs into each individual’s life is for every student to realize their maximum potential. Furthermore, whole child programs strive to create life-long learners. The purpose of this study is to show that incorporating mindfulness-based pedagogy into an educator’s classroom can have an impact on students’ emotions. Additionally, creating a mindful classroom has shown to positively impact a child’s mood, attention, social skills, and confidence (Coholic & Eys, 2015). Working with 17 first-grade students in my classroom, I conducted a quantitative, non-experimental, observational research study over the span of three weeks in Spring 2020. The students were observed using a calming meditation jar and “Brain Break” card to assess their use of mindfulness practices when self-regulating their emotions during the school day. The significance of this study is to provide new insights into the scholarship on using mindfulness practices, particularly at the elementary school level, to help foster key traits such as persistence and resiliency with their academic and personal endeavors. However, for there to be an increase in positive behaviors in the classroom, teachers must provide students with opportunities to calm their mind.


Student(s):
Annie Wagner

Faculty Mentor:
Prof. Kathleen Merrigan

Teachers’ Perceptions of Mindfulness-Based Practices
View abstract

Recent studies have popularized mindfulness-based practices in the classroom because such practices have supported students’ abilities to self-regulate emotions and behaviors based on a holistic understanding of their individual thought processes and emotional responses. The purpose of this study was to explore how elementary school educators feel about mindfulness-based practices in the classroom, specifically for students stemming from low-income families whom may be exposed to additional components of stress.The methodology utilized within this research study is a case study. The qualitative case study consisted of online surveys with Likert-Scale questions and open-ended questions, interviews and observations. The results from this study demonstrate that teachers generally support the use of mindfulness-practices in the classroom and agree that such practices can be beneficial for students. However, it was also found that not all teachers consistently implement mindfulness practices in their classroom.
 


Student(s):
Alex Yepez

Faculty Mentor:
Dr. Dan Tillapaugh

Examining the Influence of Peers within Male-Centered Programs on the Identity Development of Latinx Men.
View abstract

Nationwide, once Latinx students reach high school graduation, their enrollment in post-secondary education drops.  Though there has been data proving that college enrollment for Latinx students is increasing since 1996, the percentage of Latinx students remains below their non-Latinx peers (Bauman, 2017).  Furthermore, Latinx men have been found to have lower degree attainment rates than other men (Saenz & Ponjuan, 2009; Saenz, Ponjuan & Figueroa, 2016). Colleges and universities continue to expand their efforts in retaining Latinx men through programs that allow men of color, as a whole on campus, to come together and develop community. The purpose of this study is to understand how peer connections cultivated within male-centered initiatives influence the persistence of Latino men attending one specific four-year university in Southern California. To complete this qualitative narrative study, I conducted a focus group with a group of Latino men who participate in a male-centered initiative on their respective campus.  This significance of this study is to fill the gap of knowledge on not only the experiences of Latinx men higher education, but also how their peers and involvement in male-centered initiatives influence their identity development.  By understanding the findings from this study, higher education professionals might be better equipped to supporting Latino men and their educational endeavors through these types of programs. 


Student(s):
Kayla Zimmer

Faculty Mentor:
Dr. Lorynn Selby

Comparing Retention Rates of Students: Active Learning Teaching Method vs Traditional Teacher-Led Teaching Method
View abstract

The pendulum of popular educational strategies tends to sway from one extreme to another. This research study compares the retention rates of two popular teaching methods used in most classrooms today. The aim of this study is to compare the retention rates of students who have been taught using an active learning teaching method to students who have been taught using a traditional teacher-led teaching method. The study focuses on comparing data that was collected by four first grade teachers related to their use of two teaching methodologies over a four-week period. The teachers used a rotating approach of the two teaching methods and then assessed their group at the end of each week following instruction. The results will be compared to one another in order to gain insight into retention rates with respect to each teaching method. Teachers will participate in a basic survey in regard to their preference of teaching method to instruct, as well as rating their groups’ engagement level as it related to each teaching-method (active vs. traditional). The purpose of this study was to answer the following questions:Will students retain more information following the instruction of one teaching method (active learning teaching method) versus the other (traditional teacher-led teaching method)? Will one teaching method produce different exam results than the other? Based on teachers’ personal observations with both methods, did students have a more positively impactful experience with one more than the other? What teaching method did participants prefer for instruction?


©