Courses

PSYC 510. Psychopathology. (3).

Study of psychopathology using the DSM-IV, including etiology, assessment, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis. Prerequisite: Undergraduate course in abnormal psychology.

PSYC 512. Systems of Counseling and Psychology. (3).

Major theories and interventions in counseling and psychotherapy.

PSYC 515. Survey of Psychopharmacology. (2).

Students gain an understanding of the role of pharmacology in the treatment of mental disorders. They become familiar with major classifications of psychotropic drugs and learn their modes of action.

PSYC 516. Counseling Skills. (2).
PSYC 517. Lifespan Development. (3).

Current theories and research in cognitive, physical, social and emotional development over the life span. Prerequisite: Undergraduate course in child or lifespan development.

PSYC 518. Gender and Sexuality. (3).

Issues relating to gender identity, gender differences, gender socialization and related topics. An overview of physiological, psychological, and social-cultural variables associated with sexual identity, sexual behavior, and sexual dysfunction. Includes assessment and treatment of sexual abuse and its consequences.

PSYC 520. Law and Ethics. (2).

Law and ethics applicable to the professional practice of counseling and psychotherapy; scope of practice issues; mandated reporting laws including the assessment and reporting of child abuse.

PSYC 522. Cultural Diversity. (2).

Cultural variations in lifestyle and values, and the relationship of cultural issues to treatment procedures.

PSYC 524. Substance Abuse and Dependency. (3).

Meets the California licensure requirement for training in the detection and treatment of alcoholism and other chemical abuse and dependency.

PSYC 526. Domestic Violence and Abuse. (2).

Meets the California licensure requirement for training in assessment, detection, and intervention of domestic violence, interpersonal partner violence, and child abuse.

PSYC 530. Diagnostic and Therapeutic Interviewing. (3).

Knowledge and skills necessary for evaluations, diagnosis, preliminary case formulation, recommendations, and appropriate referrals. Communication skills are developed for effective therapeutic interactions.

PSYC 534. Group Therapy. (2).

Examines group formats for therapeutic change.

PSYC 540. Principles and Techniques in Child Therapy. (3).

This course is designed to help the student appreciate the special nature of child psychotherapy. The course will explore a variety of therapeutic orientations including the psychodynamic, family systems, cognitive-behavioral and narrative approaches. Students will be expected to provide a critical analysis of the literature as well as be willing to explore their own personal views and beliefs. The course will teach the student to assess children for treatment and to arrive at a working diagnosis. The multifaceted issues of ethnicity and culture will also be examined as will issues of divorce, loss of caretakers and domestic abuse. The student will be expected to become familiar with both research and clinical literature as it relates to psychotherapy with children and to produce a scholarly research project. Lectures, movies and classroom activities will all be part of the educational experience.

PSYC 541. Principles and Techniques in Adolescent Therapy. (3).

This course is designed to help the student appreciate the special nature of adolescent psychotherapy. The course will explore a variety of therapeutic orientations including the psychodynamic, family systems, cognitive-behavioral and neuropsychological. Students will be expected to provide a critical analysis of the literature as well as be willing to explore their own personal views and beliefs. Findings from research in adolescent development will be integrated with the literature on psychotherapy to help guide the student in constructing effective treatment plans. Clinical assessments will be taught that include DSM diagnoses as well as the impact of situational factors such as peer pressures, substance abuse, sexuality and violence. The student will be expected to become familiar with both research and clinical literature as it relates to psychotherapy with adolescents and to produce a scholarly research project. Lectures, movies and classroom activities will all be part of the educational experience.

PSYC 542. Principles and Techniques in Couples Therapy. (3).

Marital relationships; various approaches to marital therapy; assessment and intervention; issues of divorce.

PSYC 543. Principles and Techniques in Family Therapy. (3).

Family relationships; application of family therapy theory and techniques.

PSYC 544. Theories of the Recovery Model. (3).

Principles and philosophy of working with adults with serious mental illnesses. Use of functional assessment methods to analyze behavioral assets, excesses and deficits in order to define and plan rehabilitation goals.

PSYC 545. Techniques of the Recovery Model. (3).

Application of behavioral and social learning principles in working with adults with serious mental illnesses. Development of the ability to conduct skills training necessary for consumers to maintain independent living skills, interpersonal skills, social perception skills, problem-solving skills, and vocational skills.

PSYC 550. Survey of Psychological Testing. (3).

Introductory survey of assessment issues, acquainting students with techniques of assessment and an understanding of the use of testing and test results.

PSYC 561. Research Synthesis and Evaluation. (3).

Research methodology, with a focus on developing skills in utilizing the professional literature. Emphasis will be given to helping students become knowledgeable consumers of research. Prerequisite: Undergraduate course in statistics.

 
 
PSYC 570. Theories of Latino Counseling. (3).

The Latino Counseling Track with an emphasis on Theory explores psychological theories of development, pathology and normal functioning as examined from a Latino cultural perspective. The track considers issues such as the definition of self in Latino cultures and the implications that a different construction of self has for theories of development and treatment. The course challenges precepts in our psychological theories: For example, from what perspective is a culture-bound syndrome defined?; or, What is the role of a transitional object in a culture that values separation and individuation differently? The course provides a basic foundation for exploring techniques of psychotherapy with Latino populations.

PSYC 571. Techniques of Latino Counseling. (3).

The Latino Counseling Track with an emphasis on Technique draws on the theoretical implications covered in Part I of the Latino Track with an emphasis on Theory. In this course students see how theoretical implications find application in the clinical setting. The course addresses, for example, the possible function of code switching (switching between two languages) in the treatment of bilingual patients by bilingual therapists and its implications in terms of anxiety and defense. How do familial values get enacted in the treatment of patients of the same culture? What are the implications for treatment of culture bound syndromes, such as ataque de nervios? Prerequisite: PSYC-570.

PSYC 574. Attachment Theory. (3).

Attachment theory deals with the central human question of the formation of lasting connections. The course introduces students to the fundamentals of attachment theory as well as to basic research on various aspects of the theory. The course provides a developmental perspective on infant, child, and adult attachment. It also focuses on the interaction between the attachment and other behavioral systems, including the caregiving and sexual systems.

PSYC 575. Attachment Techniques. (3).

Drawing on the research and theoretical work examined in Attachment, Part I: Theory; this course reviews a number of attachment-based clinical applications in the work with couples, families, children and individuals. The course explores how current interventions with mothers who suffer from post-partum depression change the quality of a child's attachment, and how treatment with couples that focuses on elucidating attachment styles leads to meaningful change in quality of the relationship. The course critically examines current research assessing the clinical applications of attachment-based interventions. Prerequisite: PSYC-574.

PSYC 577. Family Mediation Theory and Research. (3).

This course will examine theories of conflict, family dynamics of divorce, child development implications, and mental health issues in divorce. Models of mediation of family disputes and alternate dispute resolution models will be introduced. Other topics to be studied include the legal context underlying divorce, legal remedies and limitations, as well as mental health interventions, including co-parenting therapy, reunification of parents and alienated children, and parent plan coordination.

PSYC 578. Family Mediation Application and Practice. (3).

Observation of and in vivo practice in family mediation of child custody and related issues will be introduced in this course. An overview of and practice in family mediation techniques will be presented. A main focus will be on the application of the theories covered in the first course on Family Mediation. Other topics will include management of conflicted families, interaction with court mediators, attorneys, and judicial officers and the principles of expert testimony. Prerequisite: PSYC-577.

PSYC 580. Theories of Counseling and Spirituality. (3).

This course will examine the ways in which spirituality is an influence upon the human experience. We will examine spirituality both from a theological perspective as it takes shape in various religions and as it impacts persons as a private and transcendent process. The goal of the course is to draw comparisons between psychotherapy and spirituality as processes that influence personal growth and change and to appreciate the role of spirituality in mental health recovery.

PSYC 581. Techniques of Counseling and Spirituality. (3).

This applied course picks up from the discussions of spirituality theories in the previous course and extends them into contributions for psychotherapeutic interventions. In particular, schools of psychotherapy represented by psychoanalysis, Jungian, existential/humanistic and the neurosciences will be used as the models for applying spirituality to the healing process. The student will learn how various interventions from these models address the transpersonal dimension of psychotherapy and how to consider the interventions as part of a comprehensive treatment approach. Prerequisite: PSYC-580.

PSYC 582. Selected Topics. (3).

Topics of current and particular interests or concern in counseling or clinical psychology. Students may enroll in more than one selected topics course.

PSYC 583. Intimate Partner Violence: Advanced Research, Theory, and Technique. (3).

This course will examine the history of intimate partner violence from multiple perspectives including psychological and psychosocial understandings. Current research will be presented and multiple theoretical frameworks will be explored. In addition, the course will review current approaches to treating clients who have been exposed to intimate partner violence including evidence-based practices. Cultural understanding and influences will also be studied.

PSYC 584. Intimate Partner Violence: Advanced Clinical Applications. (3).

This course will provide an in-depth examination, analysis and evaluation of current practices utilized in working with clients who have been exposed to intimate partner violence. Students will examine research, view video of therapy sessions and present their own work with clients.

PSYC 590. Independent Study. (1-4).

Approved research in an area not covered by course work listed in this catalog.

PSYC 591. Counseling Practicum I. (2).

Placement in the University's Marriage, Family and Child Counseling Center or external practicum site. Completion of PSYC 591, 592 and 593 constitutes a 12-month practicum. Hours applicable to licensing requirement. Practicum fee in addition to tuition. Prerequisites: PSYC 530 and consent of center director.

PSYC 592. Counseling Practicum II. (2).

Placement in the University's Marriage, Family and Child Counseling Center or external practicum site. Completion of PSYC 591, 592 and 593 constitutes a 12-month practicum. Hours applicable to licensing requirement. Practicum fee in addition to tuition. Prerequisite: PSYC 591.

PSYC 593. Counseling Practicum III. (2).

Placement in the University's Marriage, Family and Child Counseling Center or external practicum site. Completion of PSYC 591, 592 and 593 constitutes a 12-month practicum. Hours applicable to licensing requirement. Practicum fee in addition to tuition. Prerequisite: PSYC 592.

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