Fifty and Better

“Fifty and Better” is designed for members of our community who are 50 years of age and older and want to continue learning — just for the enjoyment and stimulation of pursuing knowledge and social engagement through interactive courses and extracurricular activities. 

 

University level courses — no exams, and no homework — the curriculum is designed to address the interests of our FABulous student population. 

All courses are offered virtually (via Zoom) at this time.  Listen to our story on KCLU and meet two of our students: Click Here to Listen

Fall Session courses will be offered September 8 - October 27, registration opens Wednesday, August 19 (and closes September 2).  Lecture courses meet for 2 hours each week; students taking Lecture courses communicate with faculty via the chat function during courses.  Interactive Seminar courses are a companion to Lecture courses (taking a deeper dive into the subject matter), meeting one our per week.  Students enrolling in a Seminar course use their cameras and microphones (Seminar courses are limited to 15 students each.)

Want to be added to our contact list or have questions?  Email us at fab@callutheran.edu

 

Class Schedule

Special Panel Event

Women in Leadership: Celebrating Women's Right to Vote and Exploring What's Next

Friday, October 2, 2020
11:45 a.m. - 1:30 p.m.
Online, Zoom platform

Panel Description:
While the COVID-19 pandemic and looming election have shaped the celebration of the
100th anniversary of women’s right to vote, the movement continues on with special
importance and challenges faced by women, particularly women of color. Please join us and
an esteemed panel of local community and civic leaders who will reflect upon the centennial
celebration of the suffrage movement, voter suppression, where women in leadership
positions find themselves today, and what needs to happen for women to gain true equity.

Panelists:

  • Dr. Lori Varlotta, President, California Lutheran University
  • Jeannette Sanchez-Palacios, District Director, California State Assembly, AD 44
  • Dr. Leanne Neilson, Provost and VP for Academic Affairs, California Lutheran University
  • Lorrie Brown, Councilmember, City of Ventura
  • Claudia Bill-de la Pena, Mayor Pro Tem, City of Thousand Oaks
  • Dr. Regina Biddings-Muro, VP of University Advancement, California Lutheran University

Moderator: Dena Jenson, Director, Center for Nonprofit Leadership, California Lutheran University

There is no fee to attend, but registration is a must.  Click the Registration & Payment tab to register!

 

Fall 2020 Virtual (Online) Session: September 8 - October 27* - REGISTRATION IS CLOSED

If you would like to be added to the contact list for the Fall session, please email FAB@callutheran.edu 

*Note: The dates for Art in Post-War Europe and America lecture on Mondays and seminar on Tuesdays, and the dates for Inside Terrorism and the U.S. Counter-Terrorism Effort on Saturdays have shifted slightly - see below for more information.

Art in Post-War Europe and America with Katherine Zoraster, M.A.

Mondays, 10am-12pm (PST)
Meeting Dates*: Sept. 14, 21, Oct. 5, 12, 19, 26 (The lecture will not meet on September 28 in observance of Yom Kippur)
Online, Zoom platform

Course Description:
The impact of the two world wars lead to a paradigm shift affecting all aspects of life, including how art was produced and appreciated. At the same time, the art movements of the second half of the 20th century were varied and diverse, sometimes overlapping each other and often in direct response to each other. This course explores the diverse forms of post-war art—from abstract expressionism, developed by artists such as Jackson Pollock, Mark Rothko and Willem de Kooning, to Pop Art, led by Andy Warhol and Roy Lichtenstein. 

Bio:
Katherine E. Zoraster is an Art Historian and a Professor of Art History at several local colleges specializing in Western art from the Renaissance to the 20th century. She graduated with a double major in English Literature and Art History from the University of California, Los Angeles. Following her undergraduate degree, she received a Master’s Degree with Distinction in Art History from the California State University at Northridge.                                                     

In addition to the courses Katherine teaches for the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute through UCLA Extension and California State University at Channel Islands, she also works as an Adjunct Professor of Art History at Moorpark College and an Art History Instructor for the full-time program at the Los Angeles Academy of Figurative Arts. Katherine also serves as a commissioner for the Burbank Cultural Arts Commission and volunteers at the Burbank Animal Shelter. In her free time Katherine is an avid runner and travels extensively.

Art in Post-War Europe and America Seminar with Katherine Zoraster, M.A.

Tuesdays, 1pm-2pm (PST)
Meeting Dates*: Sept. 15, 22, Oct. 6, 13, 20, 27 (The seminar will not meet on September 29)
Online, Zoom platform

Course Description:
Must be enrolled in the Art in Post-War Europe and America Lecture on Mondays in order to enroll in the seminar.

Bio:
Katherine E. Zoraster is an Art Historian and a Professor of Art History at several local colleges specializing in Western art from the Renaissance to the 20th century. She graduated with a double major in English Literature and Art History from the University of California, Los Angeles. Following her undergraduate degree, she received a Master’s Degree with Distinction in Art History from the California State University at Northridge.                                                     

In addition to the courses Katherine teaches for the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute through UCLA Extension and California State University at Channel Islands, she also works as an Adjunct Professor of Art History at Moorpark College and an Art History Instructor for the full-time program at the Los Angeles Academy of Figurative Arts. Katherine also serves as a commissioner for the Burbank Cultural Arts Commission and volunteers at the Burbank Animal Shelter. In her free time Katherine is an avid runner and travels extensively.

In and Out of Africa: The Evolution of Homo sapiens and the Peopling of the Earth during the Late Pleistocene with Matthew Curtis

Tuesdays, 10am-12pm (PST)
Meeting Dates: Sept. 8, 15, 22, 29, Oct. 6, 13
Online, Zoom platform

Course Description:
This course surveys the evidence for the evolution of the genus Homo and of anatomically modern humans (Homo sapiens) in Africa and the subsequent first peopling of Africa, Asia, Europe, Australia, and the Americas during the end of the Pleistocene epoch (between about 200,000 and 11,000 years ago).  We explore fossil evidence, archaeology, genetics, and paleoenvironmental data; examine what it means to be “anatomically modern”; and assess signatures of anatomically modern human behavior visible in tool production, cave paintings, burials, and resource exploitation.   We learn how anatomically modern humans differed in anatomy and behavior from other human species, such as Neanderthals, and consider various data used to reconstruct climates and landscapes of the past.

Bio: 

Matthew (Matt) Curtis is a lecturer in anthropology at CSUCI and College of the Canyons, and a broadly trained anthropological archaeologist specializing in the Holocene archaeology of Eastern Africa. He is a former National Science Foundation grant awardee, a Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) fellow, a Fulbright grantee, and is the founder and director of Eastern African Archaeology Online, a website devoted to cultural heritage advocacy, news, and information concerning archaeology in Africa. Matt has carried out archaeological research in Eritrea, Ethiopia, Kenya, and the United States and currently leads a regional archaeological survey project in northern Ethiopia for the UCLA Cotsen Institute of Archaeology.
In and Out of Africa: The Evolution of Homo sapiens and the Peopling of the Earth during the Late Pleistocene Seminar with Matthew Curtis

Wednesdays, 1:30pm-2:30pm (PST)
Meeting Dates: Sept. 9, 16, 23, 30, Oct. 7, 14
Online, Zoom platform

Course Description:
Must be enrolled in the In and Out f Africa Lecture on Tuesdays in order to enroll in the seminar.

Bio: 

Matthew (Matt) Curtis is a lecturer in anthropology at CSUCI and College of the Canyons, and a broadly trained anthropological archaeologist specializing in the Holocene archaeology of Eastern Africa. He is a former National Science Foundation grant awardee, a Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) fellow, a Fulbright grantee, and is the founder and director of Eastern African Archaeology Online, a website devoted to cultural heritage advocacy, news, and information concerning archaeology in Africa. Matt has carried out archaeological research in Eritrea, Ethiopia, Kenya, and the United States and currently leads a regional archaeological survey project in northern Ethiopia for the UCLA Cotsen Institute of Archaeology.
Age of Contradiction: The Visual Culture of the 1960s with David Parsons, Ph.D.

Wednesdays, 10am-12pm (PST)
Meeting Dates: Sept. 9, 16, 23, 30, Oct. 7, 14
Online, Zoom platform

Course Description:
Often remembered for its colorful fashion and defiant style, the 1960s era produced some of the most memorable visual images of the 20th century. In this course, we will dig deeper to examine the diverse range of visual media, including underground newspapers, protest posters, print advertising, political cartoons, and much more, as we explore the specific details and wider context of images produced during a turbulent historical moment.

Bio: 

David Parsons, Ph.D., received his doctorate in History from the Graduate Center of the City University of New York (CUNY). He is a professor and writer whose work focuses on the political, social, and cultural history of 20th century America. He has taught courses in U.S. history at CUNY and New York University, and hosts a long running weekly podcast on history and politics called The Nostalgia Trap. His book “Dangerous Grounds: Antiwar Coffeehouses and Military Dissent in the Vietnam Era” explores links between the civilian peace movement and the American military
Age of Contradiction: The Visual Culture of the 1960s Seminar with David Parsons, Ph.D.

Fridays, 10am-11am (PST)
Meeting Dates: Sept. 11, 18, 25, Oct. 2, 9, 16
Online, Zoom platform

Course Description:
Must be enrolled in the Visual Culture of the 1960s Lecture on Wednesdaysin order to enroll in the seminar.

Bio: 

David Parsons, Ph.D., received his doctorate in History from the Graduate Center of the City University of New York (CUNY). He is a professor and writer whose work focuses on the political, social, and cultural history of 20th century America. He has taught courses in U.S. history at CUNY and New York University, and hosts a long running weekly podcast on history and politics called The Nostalgia Trap. His book “Dangerous Grounds: Antiwar Coffeehouses and Military Dissent in the Vietnam Era” explores links between the civilian peace movement and the American military
We All Want To Change The World: The Beatles in the Studio (Part 2) with Cary Ginell, M.A. (Attendance in Part One NOT Necessary!)

Thursdays, 10am-12pm (PST)
Meeting Dates: Sept. 10, 17, 24, Oct. 1, 8, 15
Online, Zoom platform

Course Description: 
This course will examine the Beatles’ recording career in the studio, with an emphasis on the “revolution” of the group as songwriters and innovators, rather than focusing on "Beatlemania" (the cultural impact of the group or their personal lives). We will explore elements of the Beatles’ genius as songwriters, including their curiosity about the recording process, willingness to experiment with things that had not been done before, and especially, the ingenuity of producer George Martin in shaping, expanding, and putting the Beatles’ ideas into practice. In the class, we will play songs that many will no doubt have committed to memory over the past half-century. The hope is that this class will help you re-learn the songs with a different ear by using a more analytical approach to how the records sounded. We will dissect each album from Revolver (1966), Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band (1967), Yellow Submarine / “The White Album” (1968), to Let It Be / Abbey Road (1969), the Post-Beatles Discoveries / Live Albums / Studio “Reunions” / Love (1970 – 2018), and The Solo Years. Note: Part 1 is NOT required to take Part 2.

Bio: 
Cary Ginell is a Grammy-nominated writer and author of 12 books on American music. After a 30-year career in radio, he has spent the last 20 years as a public speaker, talking about music in classrooms, at conferences, and on cruise ships. Cary brings a lifelong passion for the recording industry to his work and is one of the world’s foremost authorities on his specialty, western swing. Currently, Cary is serving as President of the Association for Recorded Sound Collections, an international organization of music scholars and world-renowned institutions. He holds a master’s degree in Folklore from UCLA and a bachelor’s in Radio/TV/Film from Cal State University Northridge.

The Politics of Difference: Ethics, Division, & Dialogue with Robert Doyle, Ph.D.

Thursdays, 1pm-3pm (PST)
Meeting Dates*: Sept. 10, 17, 24, Oct. 1, 8, 15, 22 (to make up for only meeting from 1-2pm on 9/17, this class will also meet on 10/22 from 1-2pm)
Online, Zoom platform

Course Description: 
This course will explore one of the topics that we are often warned not to talk about: politics. Through the lens of ethics and against the backdrop of the 2020 presidential election, the course will examine the political divide in the United States. In particular, it will seek to answer whether or not conservatives and liberals can have a conversation, and, if so, how that conversation might be framed to yield productive results. We will explore specific conversations on race, social justice, health care, including COVID-19, and the environment.

Bio: 
Robert V. Doyle, PhD is an Associate Professor of Philosophy and Religions Studies at Marymount California University. In addition, Dr. Doyle has served as an adjunct professor at California Lutheran University since 2013. 

Dr. Doyle earned a PhD in the Philosophy of Religion and Theology from Claremont Graduate University where his dissertation research focused on the common good across Judaism, Christianity, and Islam.  In addition, Dr. Doyle has earned an MA in Bioethics and an MA in Theology from Loyola Marymount University. Dr. Doyle also holds an MA in Organizational Leadership from Gonzaga University. 

As an interdisciplinary scholar specializing in ethics, Dr. Doyle has taught graduate and undergraduate courses including public health, health/culture & diversity, sexual ethics, and ecclesiology. Dr. Doyle has published on health care ethics and lectures both nationally and internationally on a broad range of issues including the intersection of spirituality and religion, LGBTQ+ issues, and immigration.  He is a member of several professional organizations, serves on an editorial review board for a peer-reviewed journal, and advises a number of student organizations.

Inside Terrorism and the U.S. Counter-Terrorism Effort with Martin Ritz, M.A.

Saturdays, 10am-12pm (PST)
Meeting Dates*: Sept. 12, 26, Oct. 3, 10, 17, 24 (The lecture will not meet on September 19 in observance of Rosh Hashanah)
Online, Zoom platform

Course Description: 
This series of lectures on terrorism is designed to answer the following questions:   What is terrorism?  Why is there terrorism?  Who are the terrorists?  What are their tactics and targets?  How successful has the U.S. response to terrorism been?  What are the effects of the Patriot Act and how does the FBI and law enforcement combat the deadly threat of terrorism?  This lecture series will focus on international terrorism and domestic terrorism and you will learn about key terrorist leaders and their terrorist groups, their goals, targets and tactics.   You will learn how these groups operate, fund themselves, recruit and proselytize.  You will gain an understanding of how the 9/11 terrorist attacks changed law enforcement and the government strategies in countering terrorism.  The lectures will debate liberty vs security and the Patriot Act and what counter-terrorism strategies work and do not work.   Lastly, we will discuss whether the United States has compromised it's principles and ideals on the world stage by declaring war on terror by conducting extra-territorial renditions and enhanced interrogations.   

Bio: 
Martin Ritz is a retired FBI Special Agent with 21 years of Counter-Terrorism, Intelligence and Criminal Investigative experience.  He also served in the U.S. Navy and retired from the U.S. Naval Reserve as a Senior Chief Intelligence Specialist.  His military background includes assignments to the U.S. Embassy Athens, Greece,  the Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA) and military units specializing in the Interrogation of High Value Targets,  Naval Intelligence, Naval Special Operations and was deployed for six months to Bosnia as the Predator Program Operations Chief.   He currently teaches at California Lutheran University and Marymount California University and has also taught at California State University Northridge.  He has taught courses in Terrorism and Homeland Security, Transnational Crime, Comparable Criminal Justice Systems, Criminal Investigation, Ethics in Criminal Justice, Administration of Justice and Introduction to Criminal Justice.   He has also worked for the Sacramento County District Attorney's Office and Sacramento County Probation Department.  



Registration & Payment

Special Panel Event - Women in Leadership

  • This event is free but registration is required (see below).

  • Zoom Link will be emailed out on October 1.

 Registration:

REGISTER NOW!

Fall 2020 Virtual (Online) Session Costs

  • Lectures are $35, Seminars are $25

  • Registration is now closed

Registration:

Registration is now closed

 

Payment Options:

If you are paying by credit card or check, please choose that option on the registration form and you will be prompted to move to the self-service payment screen. Submit your credit card information or your checking information and your payment will be processed. Once you have entered all of your payment information, please make certain to click submit on the final page. 

Please note that American Express is not accepted.

If you have questions regarding registration or payment, please send an email to fab@callutheran.edu.

Policies

Registration & Payment Deadlines:

For the Fall Session 2020 Virtual (Online) Session, registration must occur by September 2 at 5pm. Students may register in advance of submitting payment, however, final payment is due by September 11. 

If you have any questions regarding the registration process, please feel free to contact us at fab@callutheran.edu. You may also click on the “Contact Us” tab for additional information.  

Class Waitlists:
All waitlisted Seminar courses are monitored by the staff. If space permits, students will be selected for enrollment based on date of recorded waitlist (first come, first serve). Students will be notified if space becomes available. If we do not receive a response, the space will be provided to the next individual on the waitlist. 

Refunds:
If for any reason a Fifty and Better course is cancelled, a full refund will be issued. For the Fall Session 2020 Virtual (Online) Session, a full refund will also be issued if we receive notification of the student’s personal cancellation by 5pm on September 15.

Contact Us

Contact Information:
Christina Tierney
Program Specialist
Phone: (805) 493-3290
Email: fab@callutheran.edu 

Location: (physical office is currently closed due to Governor's state-wide orders)
For all Fifty and Better programming, please visit us at:
132 Faculty Street, Thousand Oaks, CA 91360
https://www.callutheran.edu/map/benson-house 

Office Hours:
Monday – Thursday: 9:00am-6:00pm
Friday: 8:00am-5:00pm
(We are closed for chapel hour on Thursday from 11:15am-12:15pm)

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