Courses

PSYC 501. DBT Skills Training. (2).
Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) is an evidence based cognitive behavioral intervention initially designed to treat highly suicidal, complex, difficult to treat individuals with comorbid disorders. Multiple research studies attest to how clients’ increase in skillful behavior mediates treatment impact.  The goal of this course is to provide students with instruction in the teaching of DBT Skills.

PSYC 510. Psychopathology. (3).
Study of psychopathology including etiology, assessment, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis. Prerequisite: Undergraduate course in abnormal psychology.

PSYC 540. Principles and Techniques in Child Therapy. (3).
This course is designed to help the student appreciate the special nature of child psychotherapy. The course will explore a variety of therapeutic orientations including the psychodynamic, family systems, cognitive-behavioral and narrative approaches. Students will be expected to provide a critical analysis of the literature as well as be willing to explore their own personal views and beliefs. The course will teach the student to assess children for treatment and to arrive at a working diagnosis. The multifaceted issues of ethnicity and culture will also be examined as will issues of divorce, loss of caretakers and domestic abuse. The student will be expected to become familiar with both research and clinical literature as it relates to psychotherapy with children and to produce a scholarly research project. Lectures, movies and classroom activities will all be part of the educational experience. 

PSYC 541. Principles and Techniques in Adolescent Therapy. (3).
This course is designed to help the student appreciate the special nature of adolescent psychotherapy. The course will explore a variety of therapeutic orientations including the psychodynamic, family systems, cognitive-behavioral and neuropsychological. Students will be expected to provide a critical analysis of the literature as well as be willing to explore their own personal views and beliefs. Findings from research in adolescent development will be integrated with the literature on psychotherapy to help guide the student in constructing effective treatment plans. Clinical assessments will be taught that include DSM diagnoses as well as the impact of situational factors such as peer pressures, substance abuse, sexuality and violence. The student will be expected to become familiar with both research and clinical literature as it relates to psychotherapy with adolescents and to produce a scholarly research project. Lectures, movies and classroom activities will all be part of the educational experience. 

PSYC 562. Advanced Statistics. (3).
Advanced statistical methods, including univariate and multivariate analysis of variance, correlation, multiple regression, factor analysis, and other methods. Computer applications of statistical software for data analysis purposes will be emphasized.

PSYC 564. Advanced Research Methods. (3).
Research and evaluation methodology, including consideration of experimental, quasi-experimental, and other methods. Students write a detailed prospectus of a research project applying research methodology to a topic of interest. Prerequisite: PSYC 562.

PSYC 577. Family Mediation Theory and Research. (3).
This course will examine theories of conflict, family dynamics of divorce, child development implications, and mental health issues in divorce. Models of mediation of family disputes and alternate dispute resolution models will be introduced. Other topics to be studied include the legal context underlying divorce, legal remedies and limitations, as well as mental health interventions, including co-parenting therapy, reunification of parents and alienated children, and parent plan coordination.

PSYC 578. Family Meditation Application and Practice (3).
Students learn to apply family therapy and couple therapy principles to the field of mediation. They develop skills in the provision of mediation and ancillary mental health services to families in transition.  Students will co-mediate child custody mediations with the instructor; and work with real families going through the transitions of separation and divorce.

PSYC582. Introduction to Programming in R. (3).

The course is designed for R users who want to improve their programming skills and understanding of the R language.  Techniques and skills are taught to improve the efficiency and performance of R in the everyday workflow of social and clinical health scientists.  The course provides a review of data structures, functional programming, and debugging in the R language.

PSYC582. Advanced Techniques in Data Science. (3).
The course is divided into two parts.  First, students gain instruction in the theory of Bayesian statistics while relying on an intuitive understanding of Bayesian probability theory. Students are taught a computational approach to Bayesian statistics that covers the basics of simple linear regression through multilevel modeling.  A second part of this course will focus on applied methods for classification and prediction in the social and clinical health sciences. Topics include regression, classification trees, and random forests.

PSYD756. Introduction to Dialectical Behavior Therapy. (3).
Dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) is a comprehensive and flexible cognitive-behavioral intervention combining change strategies and acceptance strategies that are commonly encountered in many successful interventions for mental health problems. Through DBT one learns behavioral assessment and strategies, acceptance and validation, communication and case management strategies, problem solving and crisis management and many other principles and techniques that are widely used throughout psychological services.

PSYD758. Methods of Suicide Risk Assessment and Management. (3).
Students in this course will learn the risk factors predictive of suicide, gain familiarity with research examining the function of suicide, become proficient in conducting suicide risk assessments, learn principles of crisis intervention, and become proficient at conducting crisis interventions in a variety of clinical scenarios.

PSYD791. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy. (3).
Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) is a third-wave behavioral therapy that has robust empirical evidence for showing efficacy with a wide range of psychological problems. The therapy is based on Relational Frame Theory, which is the behavioral account of human language and cognition. As a truly experiential therapy, ACT employs mindfulness, acceptance, and behavioral freedom so that clients can direct their lives in accordance with their values. This course will utilize didactic, experiential, and applied learning in the philosophy, theory, and techniques of ACT.
 

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